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How to Create a Team of Customer-Focused Employees

customer-focused employee

customer-focused employee

There is no magic formula for creating a team of customer-focused employees. But one thing is certain: it’s the manager’s responsibility to create an environment that motivates employees to want to take care of customers. To create a team of employees that are personally committed to service excellence, managers may need a fresh point of view. One of the great problems in customer service is the reluctance of managers to view service as a marketing strategy. Too many see it as an after-sale service related to a previous sale, rather than ahead of the next one. Studies prove that great service is more effective at increasing profits than marketing or advertising.

The following conditions need to be met for creating customer-focused teams:

Management Commitment

Replace lip service with words and actions that consistently show employees that management is committed to the delivery of exceptional customer service. Staff meetings should focus more on meeting the needs of the customer than meeting the needs of the manager.

Employee Involvement

Listen to employee ideas. Sam Walton said, “Listen to everyone in your company, especially the ones who actually talk to customers. They know what’s going on out there.” Implement realistic, creative ideas that benefit the customer. No matter how far removed employees are from the front line, they need to believe that their work affects the customer perceptions of the company.

Policies That Benefit The Customer

Evaluate existing policies and rules to see if they are really necessary. Who benefits from them? How much do they damage customer relationships? How often are they bent or broken by managers?  If a policy needs to be in place, make sure that every employee on the team understands the reasons behind it. Trust employees. Give employees the ability and power to do the right thing for the customer–right away. Don’t undermine an employee by overriding their decision to help the customer.

Shared Customer Feedback

Everyone on the team needs to hear from the customers. Share customer satisfaction survey results. Read letters and comments from customers during staff meetings. Encourage the team to come up with a list of open-ended questions they can ask customers regularly to invite feedback and ideas for improving service. A quality service program will come to a screeching halt without management commitment, employee involvement and constant reinforcement. You know you’re part of a customer-focused team when the most important question on the mind of managers and employees alike is, “How can I do my work in a way that will delight the customer?”

Internal Customer Service

Create a “we’re in this together” environment. Help your employees to recognize that everyone in the company is one big team. Meet with other departments regularly to build understanding and collaboration between work teams. Set ground rules that simply do not tolerate gossip. Redirect employees who complain by challenging them to come up with solutions to problems.

Employee Training

View training as an investment, not a cost. This can be an investment in both customer and employee retention. Training employees is an investment in sales and marketing. It is also an investment in quality. Training must be a priority and an ongoing reinforcement of the customer focus. Provide training that equips employees with the skills and tools they need to deliver exceptional customer service.

Credit: Loyalty Leader® Inc

Building an effective customer service culture in an organization

Management must first imbibe a customer centric culture which recognizes the significance of the customer in all operations so much that even departments that do not interact with them are also focused on the customer, delivering the best service from product design to launch.

In customer service “There is only one boss. The customer. And he can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down, simply by spending his money somewhere else.” -Sam Walton

Forward thinking organizations allocate a robust budget on research just to gain as much information about their customers so that they can provide them with suitable products and services.

Apart from seeking for their customers’ wants, tastes, motivations and how buying decisions are made, they create marketing campaigns to drive purchase of these products.

All these efforts are because customers are the lifeblood of a business. No customer, no business! Customers bring in the revenue that keeps the business afloat-employees get salaries; government get taxes, etc.

At the same time, they could bring loss to a business because of their ability to boycott and influence others to do so especially with the power of social media.

For instance, last year Snapchat, (a global mobile multi messaging app used to share short lasting pictures or videos) was reported to have lost almost two billion dollars when on different occasions, Kylie Jenner and Rihanna influenced a boycott, one over dissatisfaction and the other over offensive advertisement. Customers have so much power now than ever before.

Recent research on customer behavior reports that an unsatisfied customer will tell up to fifteen people about their experience. And, the reason for customer churn out is not mainly price, but poor service.

Customers also bring good deed because when happy, their referrals and recommendations result in multiple customers, making for expansion and even more revenue streams.

A business that aims to remain vibrant for a very long time must take its customers very seriously, and this goes beyond solving complaints, or about its representatives being friendly.

Strategies for Creating a Customer Service Culture

The reason an organization can deliver good or bad customer service comes down to one thing; what is

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